Tag Archives: Facebooks Ads

Simplified Guide to Facebook Ads Funnel

No doubt that a Facebook ad is one of the greatest ways to deliver promotional messages to the intended audience. However, the chances of a stranger buying a product or service the first time he/she sees an ad of a brand is quite slim. 

To effectively convert a stranger into a customer, the brand needs to create multiple touchpoints – a funnel, to move the stranger from one point to the next. How? This is where Facebook Ads Funnel comes into the picture.

What is Facebook Ads Funnel?

Facebook Ads Funnel is a sequence of ad campaigns designed to take the stranger along the buyer’s journey. Technically speaking, this method consists of multiple campaigns with multiple ads that include different value propositions delivered to the right audience at the right moment.

The Facebook Ads Funnel consists of four main stages:

  • Awareness – Top of the Funnel (TOFU)
  • Consideration – Middle of the Funnel (MOFU)
  • Conversion/Decision – Bottom of the Funnel (BOFU)
  • Post-Purchase Stage (Convert existing buyers into loyal customers and even brand advocates)

Facebook Ads Funnel target users at every stage of the buyer’s journey:

  1. Strangers (cold audience) – people that are not aware of brand/products/service
  2. Prospects (warm audience) – people that are aware of the brand/products/service and have shown some interest
  3. Leads (hot audience) – people that are highly interested that shared their contact info and want to learn more of the brand/products/service
  4. Customers – people that converted – bought, registered, etc.
  5. Loyal Promoters – people that loved the brand/products/service that they buy regularly and promote for free. 

How to Create Facebook Ads Funnel?

The funnel building process includes choosing the right Facebook campaign objective, audience, ad format, call to action, and copy that is relevant every stage.

Stage 1: TOFU – Turn Strangers into Prospects

Top of the Funnel (TOFU) or the Awareness Stage’s goal is to attract new audiences – cold audiences. These people are unfamiliar with the brand/products/service and aren’t interested yet. 

Ads such as free trial, demo, quote or consultation offers are too early at this stage. Instead, highlight how it can solve all the problems. Warm up the cold audiences and turn them into prospects by introducing the benefits of the product.

Stage 2: MOFU – Turn Prospects into Leads

At the Middle of the Funnel (MOFU) or Consideration Stage, the goal is to turn prospects into leads by collecting contact information for further nurturing. 

At this step, it is ideal to have ads that direct prospects to the Facebook page or website. This will expose them to the product and convince them to leave their contact info. Ad offers such as downloadable pdf, special offer, free sample are good.

Prospects are still far away from the buying decision, so be careful of being too pushy.

Stage 3: BOFU – Turn Leads into Customers

At the Bottom of the Facebook Ads Funnel or Conversion Stage, the goal is to turn leads into paying customers. Finally, it’s time to start selling!

Communicate the product’s value proposition to make them buy or sign up. 

Stage 4: Post-purchase – Turn Customers into Loyal Customers and Brand Advocates

Existing customers are the most profitable since they’re easy to re-acquire. Nurture them with post-purchase Facebook ads and turn them into repeat purchasers and promoters. 

Remember, people on Facebook and Instagram aren’t actively looking for products to buy. Instead, they’re socializing with friends, reading the news or watching funny cat videos, and mostly, they see ads as an interruption.

As an advertiser, it’s a crucial job to introduce a brand/product/service without disrespecting social media experience.

Reference:

https://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2019/02/21/facebook-funnel

How & Why Facebook Ad Follows You

Do you ever feel like being followed online? Does Facebook access your microphone and listen to the products you wish to browse or buy? No and no – Facebook targets the ads you see based on your online behavior.

Let’s take an example.

John, 25yrs. old, is living in London. He is currently browsing websites for a pair of white sneakers using his mobile phone. When he’s at work, he usually checks his Facebook during free time. One day, he noticed that the ads he’s been getting were the exact items he’s been browsing. He thinks this is just coincidence. Could be. But in an advertisers point-of-view this strategy is called Retargeting.

How does this work? Below are possible scenarios.

1. The shoe store targets its ad based on certain criteria. 

Businesses can show Facebook ads to people within a certain radius, gender, age, etc. These data were provided by users during Facebook sign-up.

In this case, the store probably advertises to a certain age group, gender or residents of London where John perfectly fits that’s why he received the ad.

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Pexels.com

2. The shoe store targets its ad by interest-based on on and off Facebook activity. 

Facebook knows what customers’ interests are based on what they like and posts on the platform. From there, it determines what ads it’ll show to users.

Here’s the good part, Facebook can also figure out what other sites a user browses with the help of Facebook Pixel. These are tiny pixels the advertisers and businesses embed on their websites. As long as the website has Facebook Pixel installed, Facebook can analyze how each user behaves. 

Let’s go back to John, he received the white sneakers ad because the store targets people who browsed on their website. 

Photo by Liza Summer on Pexels.com

3. The shoe store targets by email list. 

Businesses are allowed to upload their collection of emails on Facebook whom they want to receive their ads. Usually, businesses do this to retarget customers who have purchased or have intention to purchase because the user entrusted his/her email to them. 

The store has uploaded their email list and targeted website members for their ads. In this example, John may have signed-up on the store’s website or have purchased on the store where he registered his email.

Photo by Ivan Samkov on Pexels.com

4. The shoe store works with a third-party data provider.

Advertisers sometimes work with third-party marketing services. These providers get data from sources such as credit card companies, etc. 

The shoe store might have worked with a third-party provider where they got John’s email account.

Photo by fauxels on Pexels.com

DON’T FREAK OUT! You are exposed to hundreds of ads per day and don’t notice it. You can always check why you’ve received an ad by clicking on the 3 dots on the top right corner. It won’t give specific details but at least you’ll get an idea.